Supporting Members don't see this Ad. Click here to become a supporting member.

Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: poly or rubber bushings?

  1. #1

    Default poly or rubber bushings?

    Hey guys,

    I noticed the bushings on my truck in places are worn out.

    The Internet is full of opinions on bushings and whether to use polyurethane or OEM rubber stuff.

    How hard is it to squeeze an OEM bushing if you don't have a press.

    The other strange thing is that the bushings that ARE worn out are not OEM. They're (roughly) 7 - 10 year old poly bushes from what I can tell from the paperwork that came with the truck.

    Internet says you need to grease them every 5 years, but doesn't say WHY. Is not getting greased a reason why the bushes would have crumbled and cracked? Or is it just that "lifetime" doesn't mean "lifetime"?

    thanks

  2. #2
    Rubicon's Avatar
    Rubicon is offline Ex-Coordinator & Ex-Mod Certified Trail Leader
    MappingNH Trail Scout
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Lyme
    Posts
    14,660

    Lightbulb

    It is very difficult, in my opinion, to press out rubber OE rubber bushings.

    Poly does need to be greased, but with only the appropriate lube, or they will wear and can dry out(especially in the salt belt).

    "Lifetime" warranty almost always has it's limits, but some do honor that, usually to the original purchaser only.

    I prefer rubber myself, because quality ones last a very long time, and require no maintenance. The salt and other crap that they slather on our roads, does shorten their lifespan.

    I think of Poly, as a performance item, like in racing, where precise control is more important. Typically race vehicles also get maintained and rarely drive through what we do up here(salt and the like chemicals).
    Traction, articulation, and gearing make a good off-road rig. Just a big lift, wide mud tires, and a winch simply do not.
    ~Shawn(the correct spelling ;)

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Weare NH
    Posts
    6,576

    Default

    Yes rubber can be very difficult to press in or out. But rubber when not pushed beyond its limits all the time will last a really long time. Poly is hard and not forgiving and will transmit vibration and when the grease washes out over time the things make so much noise. But poly is very simple to install. For go fast and fast response handling I would go poly if you want to enjoy a softer quieter ride with thousands of miles of use then go rubber.

    Most oem bushing are rubber and many live out there live never needing to be changed and still work fine in the junk yards.
    97 Jeep XJ Trussed/gusseted D30,Ford 8.8,locked F/R with Moly shafts and 4.56s,Stock 4.0 with a NVG241OR Rock-trac,5.5" long arm, full under armor, OBA, 35x12.5-15.

    NEA

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Keene, NH
    Posts
    2,748

    Default

    I replaced the bushings in Agnes a few years ago when the stock shackles failed. They were essentially impossible to press out so I just drilled lots of 1/4" ish holes into the rubber and got them out. I went poly and there was just something wrong about the whole setup when I was done. I can't necessarily blame the poly, maybe it was the shackles, or maybe just my whole frankenlift didn't like the combination. I had multiple people tell me my suspension was all over the place.

    Next year, when I had the transmission work done, my mechanic went back the stock shackles with rubber bushings. Everything is fine now.
    --
    Agnes - 1995 Jeep Wrangler (YJ) - 4 cylinder 35" MTRs, SM465, RockTrac, 3.5" Black Diamond Suspension SUA, Ford 8.8, HPD30 w/vacuum disconnect w/4.88s, ARB lockers front and rear, front shackle reversal, rear revolvers, lotsa skids, Bullet Proof steer modified, flat belly, engine relocation, Mastercraft seats with PRP 5 point harness
    Ruby - 2016 Jeep Wrangler Hard Rock Rubicon - bone stock except for Rock Hard skids, diff armor

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Amherst, NH
    Posts
    65

    Default Durometer rating

    I replaced all my bushings with poly. I love the feel. Now there is something that must be discussed, and that is the Durometer rating of the bushings used. A durometer measures how hard a substance is. Rubber bushings are 65, off the shelf poly are 70. I made my bushings out of 85 duro poly and the suspension is nice and tight on the road, and I still have the flex off road. I did install new rubber bushings in a few spots in the rear, but that was due to time running out and weather closing in. It takes time to make bushings, and rubber ones come in a box and are convenient. Are they tough to remove and install? Yes, but I have a 20 ton press I can use. You can take the springs down to a local shop and they will press them in and out for you for a couple of $. Also, poly bushings come in 1 and 2 piece designs. Get the 1 piece ones, the 2 piece allow movement. I love my polies, and this summer will replace the remaining rubber ones with 85 duro poly.
    1996 land Rover Discovery, 32" tires, 2" lift, running boards/Rock sliders, Blue LED dome lights and a custom cup holder. (project in progress)
    1982 Chevrolet K10 350 4V auto 4" lift 33 x 10.5 x 15 8 1/2 foot plow
    ASE L1 Master Tech, Engine Machinist, Collision Repair Specialist, Retired
    Tread Lightly, but not on me
    My youtube channel is https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCkbGciVRakRuFtGNS1m8_Rg?view

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Dunbarton, NH
    Posts
    2,032

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dogbreath077 View Post
    I replaced all my bushings with poly. I love the feel. Now there is something that must be discussed, and that is the Durometer rating of the bushings used. A durometer measures how hard a substance is. Rubber bushings are 65, off the shelf poly are 70. I made my bushings out of 85 duro poly and the suspension is nice and tight on the road, and I still have the flex off road. I did install new rubber bushings in a few spots in the rear, but that was due to time running out and weather closing in. It takes time to make bushings, and rubber ones come in a box and are convenient. Are they tough to remove and install? Yes, but I have a 20 ton press I can use. You can take the springs down to a local shop and they will press them in and out for you for a couple of $. Also, poly bushings come in 1 and 2 piece designs. Get the 1 piece ones, the 2 piece allow movement. I love my polies, and this summer will replace the remaining rubber ones with 85 duro poly.
    Does it help with the Land Rover sway? I am being serious actually. My buddies Disco 2 sways like a willow in the wind.
    "I hope you get hit by a goose, right in the sway bar!" -anon

    2015 Tacoma Access 4-banger (aka 'Scratchy') -> 285/75r16 Grabber ATX, FJC wheels, 3" OME 887s/full dakar pack, CBI sliders and full skids, Pelfreybilt Hybrid bumper, ****tybilt 9.5 XRC winch, sway bar go by bye, ARB on-board air, many many zip-tie
    1989 Ford Bronco II (aka 'Babe the Blue Pig') -> 31x10.5r15 Cheap ATs, 1.5" lift (RC coils/shocks and WULF shackles), 2.9l hamster-power, Blue Pig sticker mod

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Amherst, NH
    Posts
    65

    Default Poly helping with sway

    Yes it does. I had a tranny shop adjust my tranny shift points, and the first comemnt he had was that it was the tightest handling Rover he ever had driven. After I replaced my bushings, there was a world of difference. i love how it handles.
    1996 land Rover Discovery, 32" tires, 2" lift, running boards/Rock sliders, Blue LED dome lights and a custom cup holder. (project in progress)
    1982 Chevrolet K10 350 4V auto 4" lift 33 x 10.5 x 15 8 1/2 foot plow
    ASE L1 Master Tech, Engine Machinist, Collision Repair Specialist, Retired
    Tread Lightly, but not on me
    My youtube channel is https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCkbGciVRakRuFtGNS1m8_Rg?view

  8. #8

    Default

    Thank you all for the feedback.
    I've replaced my rear trailing arms with nolathane bushes in the back, where the already aftermarket ones were worn out. Nolathane says they try to match the durometer rating appropriate for the bushing. "Most of our bushings are 74 or 85 duro."

    Anyways, I bet just about anything replacing the worn out bushing would have felt better, but after doing these ones I'm going through any other worn out ones and replacing them. Need to find a shop that'll push out the old rubber ones for the top arm right now actually.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •