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Thread: Survival Pack

  1. #1

    Default Survival Pack

    After watching a video of a guy’s rig burning up in the middle of the desert 25 miles from civilization it got me thinking about putting together a bag containing basic survival equipment. Not to be mistaken for the ‘must have’ items for off roading, but instead what would you include in a survival bag that would contain items for basic survivial?

    Im thinking at least the following:
    • Knife
    • Lighter/waterproof matches/fire starter
    • Flashlights
    • First aid kit
    • multitool
    • MREs
    • lightweight axe
    • Survival blanket
    • water filter
    • duxt tape

  2. #2

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    I've actually got two items on my to do list: the "go bag" that you are building and a "survival tin". I heard a story about two hunters that wandered away from their truck for less than a mile and got lost (and froze to death). The survival tin is a super-mini version of the Go Bag that you keep in your pocket or wear on your belt at all times. Lots if interesting ideas online for both of these.

    Keep us posted as your kit comes together!
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    l---- L -[]lllllll[]-
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  3. #3

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    There are tons of resources online for building a "go bag" or "bug out bag". Some of them are from really hardcore preppers, anarchists or general nutcases, but there's some really good advice out there too. The survival sections at Zombie Squad actually has some really good information and was fairly light on politics/preaching the last time I browsed there.

    I'd focus the FAK on life-threatening injuries (large bandages, QuickClot, gauze, splits, etc) and go light on the Bandaids and Tylenol. Consider true emergency rations (Mainstay, Datrex, etc) over MREs, they aren't nearly as tasty but pack much smaller. Along with the axe, consider an e-tool, machete and/or "pocket chainsaw". Carry at least some water with you, along with the filter. Consider carrying some spare clothes (especially socks) and maybe a poncho or other rain gear.
    2015 JKURHR 6MT - Rancho 4" Crawler short-arm w/RS9000XLs, Yokohama G003 35s, Quadratec AL skidplates, Smittybilt X2O 10k

  4. #4

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    Here's the water filter I have for my Go Bag. Not cheap, but works great and is very lightweight: https://youtu.be/eKjSWkR39M4
    ____=__=.
    l l ,[_____],
    l---- L -[]lllllll[]-
    ()_) ()_)--o-)_). BEV: the BSA Expedition Vehicle

  5. #5
    Rubicon's Avatar
    Rubicon is offline Ex-Coordinator & Ex-Mod Certified Trail Leader
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    Thumbs up

    25 miles from civilization, is just another reason not to wheel alone ;)

    Been thinking about one of these for the for emergency medical: RESCUE-ESSENTIALS-ANKLE-MEDICAL-HOLSTER

    Another thing that Flash! mentioned, is a machete. This a a multi use tool, so those can save weight & space. I use mine as an ax/hatchet as well and it could also count as a self defense item :)

    Great list by the way!!
    Traction, articulation, and gearing make a good off-road rig. Just a big lift, wide mud tires, and a winch simply do not ;)

  6. #6

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    Over the years, and many iterations of survival/bug out/go bags I have found that most people and resources online carry too much unnecessary gear. My best recommendation is to check out Hill People Gear. Besides some nice gear, they have a great equipage system, different levels for different purposes, with explanations. I personally carry a level 1.5 equipage in a Tarahumara pack in my truck that will serve as a go bag. Coupled with addition gear in the truck, I have what amounts to a mobile level 3 equipage. They also have a forum with great discussions and info.
    Jason

    '06 Jeep Liberty - OME lift, JBA Gen 4.5 UCA's, 255/70r16 Kumho MT51 on Black Rocks, 4xGuard sliders, Skid Row plates, Aussie Locker in back, custom winch bumper

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Erebus View Post
    Over the years, and many iterations of survival/bug out/go bags I have found that most people and resources online carry too much unnecessary gear. My best recommendation is to check out Hill People Gear. Besides some nice gear, they have a great equipage system, different levels for different purposes, with explanations. I personally carry a level 1.5 equipage in a Tarahumara pack in my truck that will serve as a go bag. Coupled with addition gear in the truck, I have what amounts to a mobile level 3 equipage. They also have a forum with great discussions and info.
    Great site, thanks for sharing.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rubicon View Post
    Another thing that Flash! mentioned, is a machete. This a a multi use tool, so those can save weight & space. I use mine as an ax/hatchet as well and it could also count as a self defense item :)

    Great list by the way!!
    How could I forget the ol trusted machete. Yes, great suggestion!

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattJ View Post
    Here's the water filter I have for my Go Bag. Not cheap, but works great and is very lightweight: https://youtu.be/eKjSWkR39M4
    This looks great and nice and compact. This is definitely on my list, thanks for sharing!

  10. #10
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    I've assembled a small "wonder off" pouch that stays in my truck. It has cut down paper towels in a zip lock, for sh!t tickets or combined with gorilla tape I've used it field expedient bandage material. Has sawyer's version of a life straw, easy to light material and matches/lighter. Multi-tool, Kabar, flashlight, hand sanitizer, survival blanket, large zipties and maybe a few other small things. Its easy enough to grab and throw on your belt when going exploring/ adventuring, and I believe it should get you out of a jam with less hassle. Quickclot should be added, but for the most part with what it has it wouldn't be hard to fashion a splint if needed.

    I think better than a machete or hatchet is a kukri. I have a cheap one, but its 1/4" thick or so, I've chopped down small trees with it, and I prefer the balance. But its whatever works for you.
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  11. #11

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    A bit off topic, but I figured I’d mention that I now carry a Garmin InReach+ with me on every trip. I bought it because I do a lot of solo weekends in the woods with my two sons, neither of which has a drivers license yet. Plus, it’s a helpful ways to log coordinates for all of my trips and campsites for future reference, regardless of whether I have cellular or GPS coverage.

    The “SOS” button on the Garmin works anywhere on the planet and has two-way communication capability. The overall cost isn’t cheap, but when you compare it to all of the other costs of a trip (food, gas, tolls, insurance, repairs, etc) it’s actually a pretty small additional expense to ensure I’ll actually never have to rely on my Go Bag for more than a short period of time.
    ____=__=.
    l l ,[_____],
    l---- L -[]lllllll[]-
    ()_) ()_)--o-)_). BEV: the BSA Expedition Vehicle

  12. #12
    cda's Avatar
    cda is offline Purveyor of Shenanigans Supporting Member Tier 1
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    I know I've posted this in these threads before, but before buying a spot or inreach as your emergency locator, read the guide below to understand the very important key differences between a proper PLB and a satellite communicator.

    https://www.rei.com/learn/expert-adv...r-beacons.html

    Spot GPS units, and inreach communicators make great tools in the remote parts of the world to keep connected without paying full blown sat internet fees, and do provide a SOS function, but that SOS is managed by a third party and doesn't get you connected directly to a government SAR group. They also require batteries and charging to function, which must be managed by the user before heading out or replenished while on a long trip. these units generally transmit between 0.4 and 1.5 watts.

    PLB's have sealed batteries with a fixed expiration date, are hardened against impact, are completely waterproof, and even float in water. When activated these transmit a 5 Watt distress beacon on 406MHz with your Unique ID, this will be triangulated by NOAA/SAR satellites. Newer PLB's can even send along your exact lat/longs with the distress info. PLB's also double down by transmitting a distress tone on 121.5MHz that can be used by CAP or SAR crews to home in to your location with special SAR gear. PLB's have a guaranteed transmit time of 24hours at -20F, and around 70F they have approximately a 48hr transmit time. Also important to keep in mind is that these will summon the Air Force SAR network to save you, response time to a PLB activation once verified by an emergency contact is measured in single digit hours.

    I consider PLB's life safety devices and wouldn't trust my life with anything other than a hardened and dedicated device.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flash! View Post
    There are tons of resources online for building a "go bag" or "bug out bag". Some of them are from really hardcore preppers, anarchists or general nutcases, but there's some really good advice out there too. The survival sections at Zombie Squad actually has some really good information and was fairly light on politics/preaching the last time I browsed there.

    I'd focus the FAK on life-threatening injuries (large bandages, QuickClot, gauze, splits, etc) and go light on the Bandaids and Tylenol. Consider true emergency rations (Mainstay, Datrex, etc) over MREs, they aren't nearly as tasty but pack much smaller. Along with the axe, consider an e-tool, machete and/or "pocket chainsaw". Carry at least some water with you, along with the filter. Consider carrying some spare clothes (especially socks) and maybe a poncho or other rain gear.
    2nd the website Zombie Squad. I used to research there often and they offer a lot of info as needed. Just keep in mind they tend to lean towards disaster prep/SHTF so they may advise a more inclusive kit.

    Also 2nd the Emergency Rations over MRE's. They tend to be more stable in temperature swings that you might have in your rig if you keep it in there for a while. Supplement that with some Jerky and some comfort items (drink powder or hot chocolate depending on weather) and it should help.

    While the survival blankets (if you're thinking of the thin metal sheets) aren't bad, I'd much prefer the S.O.L. Escape Bivy myself.
    Last edited by Kilo Sierra; 10-13-2018 at 01:11 AM.

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