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Thread: The (re)building of the Team Overbuilt fab shop

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by GSSFC View Post
    Hate to burst your bubble but the mice definitely don’t hate rock wool. And if you can handle rockwool all day without gloves or a mask and not complain....I’ve got a job for you! .
    Ah crap, really? We're likely doing our attic this summer and I guess we'll find out.
    --
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  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by NotThePainter View Post
    Ah crap, really? We're likely doing our attic this summer and I guess we'll find out.
    Blown cellulose is the way to go for what it sounds like you’re trying to accomplish. Manages moisture well. Pest don’t nest in it. And there are no “gaps” in the insulation. And lastly you can install to any thickness desired. Just keep feeding the machine!
    It's all gone.

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by GSSFC View Post
    Blown cellulose is the way to go for what it sounds like you’re trying to accomplish. Manages moisture well. Pest don’t nest in it. And there are no “gaps” in the insulation. And lastly you can install to any thickness desired. Just keep feeding the machine!
    This is also in my future for the house attic. There is some insulation there now but not enough to prevent snow melt that leads to ice dams.

    I'll consider Rockwool, thanks for the suggestion Paul! I like the fact that it doesn't facilitate mold growth and repels moisture. It's a bit more expensive but is reviewed well for being a better insulator.


    The grinding process revealed some divots that cracked out pretty deep. Getting in touch with my contact at The Original Color Chips to order some crack filler to repair the damage before laying down the epoxy.
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  4. #19
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    Been insanely busy with everything and anything else. Finally finished grinding and got the crew together last weekend to lay down the epoxy. Started by tarping both doors and the stairway to the loft to control heat loss. Since the weekend was going to be rainy, we planned to heat the garage with a propane heater to maintain the same temperature to prevent condensation and allow the coating to dry a bit quicker.

    IMG_20180811_131438 by Mitchell Beauchemin, on Flickr

    Friday night: We power washed the floor to ensure all dust and dirt was removed, then got the heat and fans running to dry it and had dinner. It was dry and ready to lay the primer after dinner.

    We don't have many photos since most hands were on deck throughout the painting process. Here is a crappy photo of Andrew's feet covered in primer as we are working our way out of the garage.

    IMG_20180810_232135 by Mitchell Beauchemin, on Flickr

    The primer is an easy paint on. it is water based and just gets rolled. Andrew cut in the edges and hard to reach places and I rolled the rest with an 18" wide roller.

    Saturday morning: The cured primer coat is swept to ensure there is no dirt.

    PANO_20180811_120609 by Mitchell Beauchemin, on Flickr

    We gear up. Respirators, spike shoes (lets you walk on uncured, wet epoxy during coating process without damaging it).

    IMG_20180811_123725 by Mitchell Beauchemin, on Flickr

    IMG_20180811_123721 by Mitchell Beauchemin, on Flickr

    The middle coat is a 100% solids, 2 part epoxy. It gets mixed and poured in ribbons onto the floor. It then gets spread around with a squeegee and rolled smooth with an 18" roller. Once rolled smooth, color chips are dispersed in the air and allowed to float into the wet epoxy, creating a random pattern. This is done across the entire floor. I have no photos of the first couple steps since all hands were on deck. Here is Andrew broadcasting color chips once rolling was complete:

    MVIMG_20180811_125205 by Mitchell Beauchemin, on Flickr

    IMG_20180811_125738_1 by Mitchell Beauchemin, on Flickr

    PANO_20180811_125743 by Mitchell Beauchemin, on Flickr

    The wet final product of Saturday's efforts:

    MVIMG_20180811_171504 by Mitchell Beauchemin, on Flickr

    IMG_20180811_171501 by Mitchell Beauchemin, on Flickr

    Sunday morning: The 2nd coat should be cured and ready to accept the final layer, a UV stable clear coat.

    image-20180811_131754 by Mitchell Beauchemin, on Flickr

    I began to sweep the now dry floor to ensure no dust or dirt or bugs are on the surface in prep for the final coat. I step and the coating yields and sticks to my sock in a small spot in the middle of the floor. This spot didn't cure and likely didn't get enough part 2 (the converter that activates it to cure) and likely will never cure. This put all plans for Sunday on hold until the uncured epoxy can be removed, cleaned up, the spot get sanded and new epoxy applied to that spot. It is maybe 2' x 2' in the middle of the floor near the stairs but right in a high traffic location right in front of the proposed bench location.

    I've ordered a small amount of epoxy to repair this section. I plan to scrape up all uncured epoxy with a putty knife and scuff up the primer coat in prep to accept new epoxy. Once mixed properly and applied, I'll broadcast some more chips and let is set up. The whole floor, since it had a chance to cure longer than the re-coat timeframe of 24 hrs, needs to be scuffed to remove the sheen in prep to accept the final clear coat.

    More to come when the new epoxy arrives!
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  5. #20
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    Rubicon is offline Ex-Coordinator & Ex-Mod Certified Trail Leader
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    Really sucks Mitch about that 1 spot that really messes up the finishing of this and creating extra work :(
    Traction, articulation, and gearing make a good off-road rig. Just a big lift, wide mud tires, and a winch simply do not ;)

  6. #21
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    Looks fantastic. That is a pain to have to re do that one spot, but im sure all the work will be worth it
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  7. #22
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    So awesome Mitch! Love how thorough of a job you guys do.

    We are happy for you Nicole. I still find it funny I used to run around your house in my underwear (no everybody I'm not that deranged, I knew the previous owners when I was a wee lad... lol). Oh I had some friends over on Saturday and ironically your name came up (Cassie and Garrett), Nicole is taking Cassie's position over in Peterborough, you may not know them. Anyways we will have to get together soon.
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  8. #23
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    Thanks guys, it was a huge bummer but we should be able to repair and keep on trucking! I've got a Jeep to build!

    Anthony - Such a small world! Cassie actually texted Nicole while they were at your place asking if we knew you and talking about Garrett wanting a Jeep now (it's infectious apparently). I agree, we should get together soon!


    The bad spot is still not setting up so it is for sure the lack of part 2, the hardener, in the mix. I've ordered all the material to fix it. Thankfully, they sell "repair kits" which are basically just small quantities of epoxy designed to fix a small spot. They recommend sanding / scraping and cleaning the area to be fixed and then re-epoxying it. Since the epoxy is self-leveling, I suspect I will be able to fill in the spot with enough epoxy to make it very close to the same level as the rest of the floor.

    Here is a couple up-close shots of the unset spot. The top layer has filmed over but the build layer is still mostly just part 1, and still wet:

    MVIMG_20180815_165154 by Mitchell Beauchemin, on Flickr

    MVIMG_20180815_165157 by Mitchell Beauchemin, on Flickr
    WAGGLER: 1999 TJ: currently in pieces.
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  9. #24
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    Just add some hardener to that spot and see if it does the trick Mitch ;)
    Traction, articulation, and gearing make a good off-road rig. Just a big lift, wide mud tires, and a winch simply do not ;)

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rubicon View Post
    Just add some hardener to that spot and see if it does the trick Mitch ;)
    I thought about that approach long and hard. The mix ratio for this product is very specific and we already messed it up once so I didn't want to chance it again.

    I spent an hour scraping the soft epoxy yesterday. I found that there was a bigger area that was problematic than initially anticipated. The top had filmed over but was still wet underneath. I scraped until I found complete, solid set epoxy. I have to clean the rest of the wet and then re-grind this section, prime it, and re-pour the second coat.

    scraped_epoxy by Mitchell Beauchemin, on Flickr
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  11. #26
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    Started grinding out the scraped spot to prep it for primer again. While walking around the rest of the floor, I found 3 other spots that were not set up and had to be scraped. I ended up grinding all 4 spots right down to bare concrete and will start from scratch on them all.

    First spot ground out:

    image-20180823_181530 by Mitchell Beauchemin, on Flickr

    Three other spots discovered. One over by the door with no tape yet:

    image-20180823_185700 by Mitchell Beauchemin, on Flickr

    All spots ground out. I'm letting the them remain uncovered over the weekend to dry out if necessary. I will proceed with re coating next week.

    image-20180823_193121 by Mitchell Beauchemin, on Flickr
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  12. #27
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    What are you going to do when there is welding or grinding to be done? Throw down welding blankets?
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  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Goat View Post
    What are you going to do when there is welding or grinding to be done? Throw down welding blankets?
    No need to cover it up. Once the final clear coat is on and cured, the floor will be able to withstand grinding sparks and weld slag dropped directly on it, as well as heavy static weight, impact, and abrasions. The clear coat is designed to be a wear layer to protect the high build 2nd coat that provides the color, chip retention and integrity. This is one of the reasons I went with a 3 coat system as opposed to a standard 2 coat system, which leaves the build layer as the wear layer. As the epoxy wears, it can get damaged easier than the clear topcoat and cause peeling and damage to the concrete underneath.

    This same flooring system has been installed in a friend's garage for over a year. He has soldered copper pipes and dripped molten solder on the floor with no damage. It has seen a lot of foot traffic, tire traffic, and building materials (they are renovating the whole house) without any damage. Cleanup is a breeze with a floor squeegee. Very pleased with the performance, thus why I'm installing it in my own garage :)
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  14. #29
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    Spent last night finalizing the grind into the painters tape, cleaning up and laying down the first primer coat. I had plenty extra so I started painting the foundation walls.

    image-20180829_202705 by Mitchell Beauchemin, on Flickr

    image-20180829_202712 by Mitchell Beauchemin, on Flickr

    image-20180829_211110 by Mitchell Beauchemin, on Flickr

    I plan to mix up the 2nd coat epoxy tonight to finish up the patch job. Once that sets up, I'll scuff / sand to make everything match the right height and remove the glossy surface and finish the job with the clear coat.
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  15. #30
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    Awesome floor!
    "I hope you get hit by a goose, right in the sway bar!"
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