Supporting Members don't see this Ad. Click here to become a supporting member.

Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 72

Thread: Cooler opinions?

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Derry NH
    Posts
    654

    Default

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	zpyWJ6n.jpg 
Views:	88 
Size:	39.5 KB 
ID:	31521  
    -TYLER - - Illegitimi non carborundum - -
    '14 Nissan Frontier SV 4x4 V6 Auto
    -3" lift with Nisstec MK84 coilovers & OME leafs, HeftyFab skids & Whiteknuckle sliders, WARN Winch & bumper, 32" Duratracs

  2. #32
    Rubicon's Avatar
    Rubicon is offline Ex-Coordinator & Ex-Mod Certified Trail Leader
    MappingNH Trail Scout
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Lyme
    Posts
    13,886

    Talking

    Quote Originally Posted by GSSFC View Post
    Kinda like which is heavier a pound of rocks or a pound of feathers.
    I get people with that all the time, lol.



    Quote Originally Posted by mtyler11 View Post
    Haha, me too :)
    Traction, articulation, and gearing make a good off-road rig. Just a big lift, wide mud tires, and a winch simply do not ;)

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Strafford
    Posts
    180

    Default

    Cooler shock? Just dump salt in your cooler, the melted ice will be much colder because the salt doesn't allow it to freeze.

    Mythbuster did an episode on this IIRC
    91ish Ranger 351W Narrowed HP D44 SAS 14 Bolt C&C rear 39s 4.88s Locked F+R
    67 Kaiser/Jeep M715 38s 5.89 gears Running Project

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Keene, NH
    Posts
    2,385

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by farmer View Post
    Cooler shock? Just dump salt in your cooler, the melted ice will be much colder because the salt doesn't allow it to freeze.
    It should be around 24 degrees, not 32, which is great. But you also no longer have ice water for drinking.
    Quote Originally Posted by farmer View Post
    Mythbuster did an episode on this IIRC
    They showed that salt water is great for cooling beer, yes, but that episode didn't go into the longevity of the cold in the cooler.

    And better than Mythbusters, I had a bartender chill a warm beer in a few minutes right in front of me years ago. Heavily salted water, ice, and bar towel wrapped around the bottle.
    --
    Agnes - 1995 Jeep Wrangler (YJ) - 4 cylinder 35" MTRs, SM465, RockTrac, 3.5" Black Diamond Suspension SUA, Ford 8.8, HPD30 w/vacuum disconnect w/4.88s, ARB lockers front and rear, front shackle reversal, rear revolvers, lotsa skids, Bullet Proof steer modified, Mastercraft seats with PRP 5 point harness
    Ruby - 2016 Jeep Wrangler Hard Rock Rubicon - bone stock except for Rock Hard skids, diff armor

  5. #35

    Default





  6. #36
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Wolfeboro, NH
    Posts
    3,814

    Default

    regardless of what temp it feeezes at itís still cold. So I guess I donít buy the reason? Great it freezes at 28*. So if your feeezer is 0*f then the ice or yeti ice will be 0*. What difference does it make?
    It's all gone.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    New Boston
    Posts
    59

    Default

    NotThePainter nailed the theory. Changing phase from a solid to liquid takes extra energy over just raising the temp of the substance. How much it matters in practice is another story entirely. I have one of the yeti ones, but I probably wouldn't if it hadn't been free. Whenever I pull it out of the cooler, a bunch of other ice has frozen to it, not sure if that means anything.
    Scott

    2003 Ford Ranger

  8. #38
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Temple NH
    Posts
    86

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NotThePainter View Post
    I'm going to probably disagree with you here. (And later, run the tests to see just what is what!)

    Here's how I understand it.

    Ice, and the special gel packs, and many other things are phase change materials. This is fancy speak for something that can be solid, liquid or gas, or maybe just two of them. Wood can only be solid, and I'm pretty sure that iron can only be solid or liquid. Water, of course, can be solid (ice), liquid, or gas (steam).

    Phase change materials have a property known as heat of fusion. This means that extra energy is needed to change the phase. From Phase Change Materials...:
    Water, the most commonly used sensible heat storage device, has a specific heat of 4.18 Joules per gram per degree Celsius (J/g/įC). Therefore, if we want to heat 1 gram (approximately 1 cc or 1 ml) of water up 1įC then we have to put in 4.18 joules of energy into the water. Conversely, if we want to cool 1 gram of water down 1įC then we will take out 4.18 joules of energy. However, if we want to freeze water by going from 1įC to 0įC then we will have to take out more than the normal 4.18 J/g/įC of specific heat. When water freezes it goes through a phase change, liquid to solid. The amount of energy that is removed in this change of phase is no longer 4.18 J/g/įC but 333 J/g. This relatively large amount of energy required to go through a change in phase between solids and liquids is referred to as the ďlatent heat of fusion.Ē Not only is this much energy needed to be removed to freeze water, but this much energy is also needed to be absorbed to melt 1 gram of ice. This is the reason why ice is such a good material to cool other objects around 0įC.

    This is why ice is such a great material for coolers. 333 J/g is way more than 4.18 J/g.

    But, can we do better? Cooler Shock claims that they do. (Sadly, they don't publish the specific heat of their product.) But, even if it was the same, or even worse, Cooler Shock can be better. Why? The 18 degrees vs 32 degrees thing.

    You see, if you make your own ice in your home freezer, yes, it will be at 0 degrees. (If you keep it there long enough.) But once you take it out it is now rising up to 32 degrees. (I'm going on the assumption that it takes 4.81 J/g to rise one degree.). Once it hits 32 degrees, it now starts melting and that's where the huge specific heat helps. But this means that ice will quickly reach 32 degrees.

    Cooler Shock will do the same thing, rise quickly from 0 to its phase change temperature, which is 18 degrees. This means it will keep the items in the cooler colder. (Indeed, I've have drinks freeze in a cooler with cooler shock, I've never seen ice do that.) These last 2 paragraphs are paraphrased from Cooler Shock's website. So take it with a grain of salt, but it makes sense to me.

    Now, can we test this? Yes. Next week I'll start a test with ice and with cooler shock. I have a remote thermometer so I can measure the inside temperature without opening the cooler. (I've never tried this, I hope it works!)

    I post back when I run the tests
    i did end up buying some of the shock packs but never got the chance to try them out. Definitely looking forward to your test! I added a total of 5 bags of ice over 3 days of camping. It was really hot out so i figured thats why it melted so fast.

  9. #39

    Default

    Cool! (yes, I just did that)

    Maybe add this to the testing: http://www.coolersalt.com/

    Impressive that someone found a way to claim their salt is better than everyone else's . . . that hustle probably started in ancient Egypt.

  10. #40
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Temple NH
    Posts
    86

    Default Coleman Thoughts

    So I took the Coleman 5 Extreme 70Qt camping last week during that heat wave. I ended up putting 5 bags of ice in it total over 3 days of camping.

    - It did cool warm beers and waters down fairly quickly

    - I like how it takes a little bit of a push to get the top to completely seal.

    - I like the handles and they're comfortable to hold.

    - For the price, I'd say it's worth it.

    I just hate the fact of having to constantly remember to get ice, the water that builds up, people forgetting to keep the water in mind when putting meat and food that needs to stay dry inside it. I was pretty bummed when I opened it up to see brown water because the container of left over pulled pork sandwich was completely on it's side. I'm going to try to find a tupperware container that's big enough to leave in one side to keep things dry but with some ice packs.

    I'm starting to think that one of those fridges might be worth my while a little bit down the road.

  11. #41

    Default

    I learned the same "brown water" lesson. I now use water-tight containers for all my food on trips. Makes everything so much better and easier out in the woods.

    And then I ended up switching to a fridge anyway, which has the added benefit of much more storage space (no ice).


  12. #42
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Fitchburg, MA
    Posts
    830

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dun_right View Post
    Iíve definitely seen this before! Im gunna stick with the Coleman. Thereís no way Iím gunna be spending a week off the grid for a while. The polar cap will definitely be my choice at that point!
    I switched to dry ice when I've had to keep food cold for more than a day or two. It's pricey but it lasts a lot longer, I figure it would take me 10 years or more of use at the rate I camp for longer than a few days to make up the difference between a $30 cooler and a $300 cooler.

    The secret to using dry ice is to insulate it really well inside a cooler. Cover a 10 lb. slab of dry ice (about 10x10x2) on all sides with 1" thick styrofoam, this slows the sublimation and keeps the temperature well above the -79C of the dry ice. That much dry ice would only last 24 hours without being insulated. On our last 4 day trip there was still enough dry ice left to keep food cold using two 10 lb. slabs. In fact the dry ice lasted for another day after we returned.

    The beauty of it; no water! Everything in the cooler stays dry. I may do a comparison next time using the "Cooler Shock" just to see how different that is.
    Mary Anne: 1988 YJ, 258, Weber 32/36 DGEV, AX15/231, 4.11 HP-D30 & non c-clip D35 w/Truetrac, 33" KO2's, BDS 2" lift, a bunch of skid plates, Warn 9.5ti

    Member: The Ancient and Honorable Society of the Leaf Spring

    KC1EIJ
    WQZJ411

  13. #43
    Rubicon's Avatar
    Rubicon is offline Ex-Coordinator & Ex-Mod Certified Trail Leader
    MappingNH Trail Scout
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Lyme
    Posts
    13,886

    Lightbulb Just sayin'...

    For less than the price of a Yeti -- http://forums.exploringnh.com/showth...ghlight=fridge
    Traction, articulation, and gearing make a good off-road rig. Just a big lift, wide mud tires, and a winch simply do not ;)

  14. #44
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Temple NH
    Posts
    86

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BlueberryHill View Post
    I switched to dry ice when I've had to keep food cold for more than a day or two. It's pricey but it lasts a lot longer, I figure it would take me 10 years or more of use at the rate I camp for longer than a few days to make up the difference between a $30 cooler and a $300 cooler.

    The secret to using dry ice is to insulate it really well inside a cooler. Cover a 10 lb. slab of dry ice (about 10x10x2) on all sides with 1" thick styrofoam, this slows the sublimation and keeps the temperature well above the -79C of the dry ice. That much dry ice would only last 24 hours without being insulated. On our last 4 day trip there was still enough dry ice left to keep food cold using two 10 lb. slabs. In fact the dry ice lasted for another day after we returned.

    The beauty of it; no water! Everything in the cooler stays dry. I may do a comparison next time using the "Cooler Shock" just to see how different that is.
    My dad always used to talk about getting dry ice for camping instead of regular ice. We never ended up trying it out. Now Iím definitely more inclined, knowing youíve had good luck with it. How much would a slab that big cost? Where could I get my hands on some? I want to try it out soon, just to do it. Does it actually freeze stuff solid or does the styrofoam keep that from happening?

  15. #45
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Temple NH
    Posts
    86

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MattJ View Post
    I learned the same "brown water" lesson. I now use water-tight containers for all my food on trips. Makes everything so much better and easier out in the woods.

    And then I ended up switching to a fridge anyway, which has the added benefit of much more storage space (no ice).
    Thatís what Iím thinking to try next time.

    Iím going to research how the fridges work and see how much of a viable option it actually is for me. If you have any insight, itís very welcome!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •